I had a wonderful experience studying at UC for MS in Information Systems. Coming back to school after 4-5 years wasn’t easy but necessary for the growth ahead. If you haven’t realized yet from the various online forum, the MS-IS program at UC can be really intense for some and then there are others who go through it quite smoothly.

  • Wear a suit: Wear a suit when a representative of any organization comes to speak to you, you are the brand of the program and the academic director, Prof. Robert Rokey will make sure that you represent it well.
  • For the international students: Get a driver’s license as soon as possible. You will end up driving in 9 months as you will need to get to work. Additionally, the longer you have driven without incident the lower your insurance premium may be.
  • For the programming newbie: While the program does accept people from all walks of life, there are certain courses that are programming intensive. As a UC student you have free access to Lynda.com, try going through programming basics and C# courses that will help you do better in class.
  • Internship search: Try to play to your strengths instead of focusing on your weaker skills, there is a high likelihood that you might end up getting an internship in the line of work that you were already doing. Whatever you do, decide about what you want at the end of the program as soon as possible, it will help you narrow down the organizations you want to work for.
  • Friday Seminars: Every Friday, we have seminars from companies that could potentially hire MS IS students. Ask questions in Friday seminars, regardless of whether or not the organization presenting may be sponsoring H1 visa (at that moment). Your inquisitive nature shows your interest in the organization and your interest might help them change their mind about sponsoring you or other international students.
  • Take in the international culture: Try learning a few words of the languages that people speak around you and not just your own. There is a sense of exuberance, when you hear someone from another country speak your language. Essentially, get out more and be a global citizen.
  • You are not just your name: What you do represents your country.

There will be enough advice given throughout the program by your peers and professors and trust me when I tell you that Ms. Rosemary Andrew (Asst. Academic director) and Prof. Robert Rokey (Academic director) are the best people to go for advice when you really need it. If you are unsure or feel lost, don’t be afraid to reach out to those around you for help.